This booklet is a continuation of the video vignette series - 'The Invisible Cyclist' showcasing more of those cyclists in the city who cycle everyday, irrespective of the hostile conditions they face. These cyclists come from different locations in the city, and an effort has been made to know more about their daily routine, role of the bicycle in their life, the problems they face and other personal nuances which are crucial in generating an identity for cyclists.

The transportation dynamics are being redefined world over to become mass transit oriented from hitherto private motorist oriented. Multi-modal, connected transport designs are being accepted as more conducive for the livability of the city, as opposed to designs prioritizing the motorists’ convenience. The importance of the bicycle in providing the last mile connectivity in such a multi modal transport set up is being pursued by some cities in a very successful manner. Priority is given to the cyclist, with specially designed infrastructure which also encourages greater respect for cyclists.

However, the picture in Indian cities is still very motorist dominated, and infrastructural development is largely directed towards serving private vehicles.

The media group, Sakal, took the initiative to plan a ‘Pune Bus Day’ to highlight and publicize the need for a better bus service, bring together a wide array of stakeholders to support the effort and run almost twice the number of buses on November 1, 2012 with an appeal to people to use the city bus instead of their own vehicle on that day. The whole event was planned in partnership with PMPML, the city bus service provider. Parisar conducted a couple of independent surveys (user feedback survey and traffic count survey) to assess the impact of the event. The results show an overall high level of satisfaction with the concept, but as expected, there was only a slight decrease in the other traffic on that day.

The budget of any city tends to reflect the trend of its development, and ideally priority sectors should get more allocations than the others.

The budget document of PMC is very difficult to understand, being organized by different departments instead of being in terms of sectors such as traffic and transportation, sewerage and water etc. For example, traffic and transportation items are found scattered in departments such as traffic department, roads department, ward works, special projects and public transport projects and JNNURM. The budget has been re-analysed by Parisar to find sectoral allocations.